News
Location : Home > News

Fiber optics starting to replace microwave

Time : 2015/2/6 16:32:11 | Source :
Favorites | Copy | Print | Visit : 1707 | More about《News》| 【Close window


SIREN—The long distinguished history between Burnett County and Siren Telephone Company has now turned its attention to the new emergency communication towers and the technological puzzle of narrowband radio frequencies.

 

“We were the 13th county in the state to have an enhanced 911 system back in 1992 — and we were the first non-Ameritech  company to provide that service,” Sid Sherstad, president of Siren Telephone, explained. “We used the old 286-processors, which were state-of-the-art back then.”


The 911 call would come in and the enhanced system would state who the caller was, where the caller was calling from, what fire zone the caller was in, and what ambulance zone the caller was in.


“It went well but it was challenging to keep it upgraded due to budget constraints,” Sherstad laments.


Nearly a quarter of a century has passed and obviously technology is continuing to advance.


“We are working on fiber optic connections between the towers for the narrowband emergency dispatch,” he continued.


In fact, Sirentel has a 180-foot self-supporting tower in Jackson Township.


“We are working with Burnett County to lease space for the emergency dispatch antenna on our tower and then to get a fiber optic cable connection back to the Government Center dispatch,” Sherstad noted.


It used to be a series of microwave dishes on towers throughout the county transmitting fire, ambulance and police communications.


“It’s fine for voice transmissions such as ‘Car 41 go to such-and-such address,” Sherstad pointed out. “But going forward police are going to need more and more bandwidth.”


Law enforcement officers will have devices on their uniform capable of recording, both video and audio, and that recording needs to be transmitted back to the dispatch center.


“At some point in the future that will be fed live and the command center will see what’s going on in the field,” he said. “That transmission can be handled better with the fiber optic lines.”


The current microwave system can be affected by wind, rain or snow and is limited as to what it can carry.


“The fiber optic line is better because you have a controlled data stream — the line is buried underground,” Sherstad reported. “Fiber optic isn’t perfect but it’s better than microwave and it is getting better — plus, fiber optic prices are coming down.”

 

 

 

 

Prev : Cable compendium: a guide to the week’s submarine and terrestrial developments
Prev : Optical Fiber Communications Distance Doubles